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Texas, Culberson County, 135 Acres. TERMS $650/Month
Texas, Culberson County, 135 Acres. TERMS $650/Month


 
Our Price: $65,000
Down Payment $121.00

Quantity in Stock:SOLD (Out of Stock)
Product Code: TX_CULBERSON_135_TERMS
Qty:

Description
 
Untitled 3
Featured Item: Large 135 Acre Property,  Culberson County, TX.

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Property Highlights

 

 

Financing:
This lot is being offered for sale with financing. Simply make the small down payment, and the land contracts and coupon books will be emailed and hard copy mailed to you immediately. You can start using or building your land while you are making payments.

Checkout: 
The checkout above bills the down payment of $121 only.

 

 

SALES PRICE: $65,000
DOWN PAYMENT: $121
 
MONTHLY PAYMENT: $650
INTEREST: 9%

10% DISCOUNT ON REMAINING BALANCE IF PAID EARLY

 

 


 











Location

and Legal

Description

BLK 45 SE/4 & SW/4 SEC 5 PSL

31.7348888, -104.0752901

State Texas County Reeves
 

Latest Reeves County, Texas, weather
INVEST or RESELL!
Size 135 Acres
Taxes Taxes Total Less Than $250 Per Year

 

Utility Infrastructure

Rural

Time Limit to Build

None

Information

 

Culberson County is located in the Trans-Pecos region of West Texas. It is bordered by New Mexico to the north and by Hudspeth, Reeves, and Jeff Davis counties in Texas. Van Horn, the county seat, is approximately 120 miles east of El Paso in the southwestern part of the county. The county's center lies about thirty-six miles northeast of Van Horn at approximately 3227' north latitude and 10429' west longitude. Interstate Highway 10 and U.S. Highway 80 cross southern Culberson County from east to west; U.S. Highway 90 enters the county from the south and terminates at Van Horn; and U.S. highways 62 and 180 cross the county's northwestern corner. The Missouri Pacific Railroad crosses southern Culberson County, paralleling Interstate 10; the Southern Pacific crosses the county's southwestern corner; and a spur of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe enters northeastern Culberson County from New Mexico and ends at Rustler Springs.
Culberson County comprises 3,815 square miles of terrain that varies from mountainous to nearly level, with elevations ranging from 8,751 feet on Guadalupe Peak, the highest spot in the state, to 3,000 feet. The county is in the Rio Grande basin. Soils in Culberson County are primarily shallow and stony, with some clay and sandy loams and sand. Vegetation consists of scrub brush, grasses, cacti, creosote bush, post oak, chaparral, oak, juniper, mesquite, yucca, and agave, with Douglas fir, aspen, Arizona cypress, maple, and madrone trees in the Guadalupe Mountains. The Guadalupes are also the home of several endangered or locally rare plant species, including bigtooth maple, ponderosa pine, chinquapin oak, Rocky Mountain juniper, Texas madrone, and Mexican buckeye, and of the only elk in Texas. Dolomite, gypsum, limestone, salt, silver, copper, lead, zinc, barite, and molybdenum are among the minerals found in Culberson County. The climate is mild and dry, with an average minimum temperature of 30 F in January and an average maximum of 94 in July. The growing season averages 224 days a year, and the average annual precipitation is ten inches. Less than 1 percent of the land in Culberson County is considered prime farmland.

Today Culberson County is best known as the site of Guadalupe Mountains National Park,qv which includes Guadalupe Peak and is a major tourist attraction. The Guadalupes and the county's other mountains, such as the Delaware, Beach, Wylie, Sierra Diablo, Van Horn, Apache, and Baylor ranges, made the area ideal for Indians seeking protection from their enemies and a remote home base from which to launch attacks. The earliest sign of human occupation in the area, found in the Guadalupes, is a 12,000-year-old Folsom point. Later, hunter-gatherers probably inhabited the mountains only during the summer; they also left artifacts, as well as pictographs. The most famous indigenous inhabitants of the mountains, the Apaches, arrived about 600 years ago. They harvested agave, yucca, and sotol when meat was unavailable, and their agave-roasting pits are still visible in the Guadalupes.

 
 

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